IPL 2024 impact will be more than volume as Orange Cap becomes less relevant

IPL 2024 impact
Royal Challengers Bangalore’s Virat Kohli watches during the Indian Premier League (IPL) Twenty20 cricket match between Kolkata Knight Riders and Royal Challengers Bangalore.
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IPL 2024 impact

Despite Orange Cap holder Virat Kohli’s consistent run-scoring, RCB r

emain at the bottom of the table with their sixth consecutive defeat on Sunday.

Virat Kohli is the holder of the Orange Cap in IPL 2024, as he has been since the first week of the exactly one-month-old competition.

The former India captain has scored 379 runs at an average of 63.16 and a strike-rate of 150.39, which are perfectly acceptable numbers indicating both supreme consistency and a healthy rate of scoring. Still, Royal Challengers Bangalore are firmly at the bottom of the table, suffering their sixth consecutive defeat on Sunday and having won only one match from eight this season.

There are two ways to look at this bizarre scenario – either that Kohli is going out alone largely because of being let down by the batting group around him, or that he is doing the same thing as those below him. Have not been successful in making an impact. Batting chart.

SEE ALSO : KKR, DC, now MI: In the home-away format of the IPL, are local pitch makers providing enough home advantage to the host teams?

RCB has two other batsmen to score more than 200 runs – captain Faf du Plessis on 239 (average 29.87, strike-rate 152.22) and Dinesh Karthik on 251 (62.75, 196.09). Of the 12 players ahead of him among the top run-scorers, only three boast a better strike-rate than Karthik; Clearly, these three belong to a franchise that has taken the tournament by storm with three of the four highest scores this season all being over 250.

Just after the halfway stage of league action, Travis Head (324 runs) has the highest strike-rate among players with at least 200 runs, at a staggering 216. His opening partner at Sunrisers Hyderabad, the lesser-known Abhishek Sharma (257), is scoring only marginally – very, very marginally – slower at 215.96 and South African destroyer Heinrich Klaasen (268) is scoring at 198.51 per 100 balls faced.

Scored runs. Is it any surprise that SRH are third in the table with five wins from seven matches? indeed it is. One would have thought that with such firepower in the top four, they would occupy a high position, but that is a completely different matter.

Coming back to the orange cap. When it was introduced in 2008 – the Purple Cap is its bowling counterpart, awarded to the leading wicket-taker – it did not raise too many eyebrows. With Twenty20 cricket in its early stages, the IPL was India’s first sustained foray into the cricket world with the new format. Teams and individuals were finding their feet, and so most of the runs in the edition that brought the orange cap didn’t seem like the worst deal.

However, over the last 17 years, the face of the 20-over game has changed beyond recognition. Today, it’s less about quantity and more about impact. Yes, runes still hold a lot of meaning, but they aren’t the be-all and end-all. Take, for example, the Mumbai Indians vs Delhi Capitals match at the Wankhede earlier this month.

Rohit Sharma (49), Ishan Kishan (42) and Tim David (45) all scored more runs, and at excellent strike-rates, but the game-changer was Romario Shepherd, who destroyed Anrich Nortje in the final over, in which There were 32 runs. Shepherd was out after scoring 39 not out off 10 balls. How can he be less than three batsmen reaching the 40s?

Among the top ten run-scorers this season, only three batsmen have scored slower than Kohli – fourth-placed Gujarat Titans leader Shubman Gill (146.79), his compatriot Sai Sudarshan (122.27) and Lucknow Super Giants captain KL Rahul (143). LSG is currently fifth, GT sixth.

Both teams have been served quite well by the batsmen following these openers, but RCB have not done so overall. Kohli would happily exchange the Orange Cap for more, more incisive and decisive support of the batsmen below him because, more than anyone else, he knows that there is no point in scoring the most runs, given that The franchise he led for a decade is lagging behind. Bottom of the pack and still searching for their first title in their 17th year of existence.

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IPL Governing Council chairman Arun Dhumal has agreed to revisit the Impact Player rule at the end of the season, following Indian captain Rohit’s revelation that he is not a big fan of this innovation. As far as the Orange Cap situation is concerned, Dhumal and his team will do well in shifting the goalposts as well.

A thoughtful mix of volume and impact would be a more realistic assessment of the value of a batsman’s contribution, so why not combine average and strike-rate when awarding the Orange Cap? As things stand, this will give Kohli a figure of 213.55, Head 270 and third-highest scorer Riyan Parag a figure of 225.02. Isn’t this a more realistic portrayal of everyone’s impact this season?

Despite Orange Cap holder Virat Kohli’s consistent run-scoring, RCB remain at the bottom of the table with their sixth consecutive defeat on Sunday.

Virat Kohli is the holder of the Orange Cap in IPL 2024, as he has been since the first week of the exactly one-month-old competition. The former India captain has scored 379 runs at an average of 63.16 and a strike-rate of 150.39, which are perfectly acceptable numbers indicating both supreme consistency and a healthy rate of scoring. Still, Royal Challengers Bangalore are firmly at the bottom of the table, suffering their sixth consecutive defeat on Sunday and having won only one match from eight this season.

There are two ways to look at this bizarre scenario – either that Kohli is going out alone largely because of being let down by the batting group around him, or that he is doing the same thing as those below him. Have not been successful in making an impact. Batting chart.

RCB has two other batsmen to score more than 200 runs – captain Faf du Plessis on 239 (average 29.87, strike-rate 152.22) and Dinesh Karthik on 251 (62.75, 196.09). Of the 12 players ahead of him among the top run-scorers, only three boast a better strike-rate than Karthik; Clearly, these three belong to a franchise that has taken the tournament by storm with three of the four highest scores this season all being over 250.

Just after the halfway stage of league action, Travis Head (324 runs) has the highest strike-rate among players with at least 200 runs, at a staggering 216. His opening partner at Sunrisers Hyderabad, the lesser-known Abhishek Sharma (257), is scoring only marginally – very, very marginally – slower at 215.96 and South African destroyer Heinrich Klaasen (268) is scoring at 198.51 per 100 balls faced. Scored runs. Is it any surprise that SRH are third in the table with five wins from seven matches? indeed it is. One would have thought that with such firepower in the top four, they would occupy a high position, but that is a completely different matter.

Coming back to the orange cap. When it was introduced in 2008 – the Purple Cap is its bowling counterpart, awarded to the leading wicket-taker – it did not raise too many eyebrows. With Twenty20 cricket in its early stages, the IPL was India’s first sustained foray into the cricket world with the new format. Teams and individuals were finding their feet, and so most of the runs in the edition that brought the orange cap didn’t seem like the worst deal.

However, over the last 17 years, the face of the 20-over game has changed beyond recognition. Today, it’s less about quantity and more about impact. Yes, runes still hold a lot of meaning, but they aren’t the be-all and end-all. Take, for example, the Mumbai Indians vs Delhi Capitals match at the Wankhede earlier this month. Rohit Sharma (49), Ishan Kishan (42) and Tim David (45) all scored more runs, and at excellent strike-rates, but the game-changer was Romario Shepherd, who destroyed Anrich Nortje in the final over, in which There were 32 runs. Shepherd was out after scoring 39 not out off 10 balls. How can he be less than three batsmen reaching the 40s?

Among the top ten run-scorers this season, only three batsmen have scored slower than Kohli – fourth-placed Gujarat Titans leader Shubman Gill (146.79), his compatriot Sai Sudarshan (122.27) and Lucknow Super Giants captain KL Rahul (143). LSG is currently fifth, GT sixth. Both teams have been served quite well by the batsmen following these openers, but RCB have not done so overall. Kohli would happily exchange the Orange Cap for more, more incisive and decisive support of the batsmen below him because, more than anyone else, he knows that there is no point in scoring the most runs, given that The franchise he led for a decade is lagging behind. Bottom of the pack and still searching for their first title in their 17th year of existence.

IPL Governing Council chairman Arun Dhumal has agreed to revisit the Impact Player rule at the end of the season, following Indian captain Rohit’s revelation that he is not a big fan of this innovation. As far as the Orange Cap situation is concerned, Dhumal and his team will do well in shifting the goalposts as well. A thoughtful mix of volume and impact would be a more realistic assessment of the value of a batsman’s contribution, so why not combine average and strike-rate when awarding the Orange Cap? As things stand, this will give Kohli a figure of 213.55, Head 270 and third-highest scorer Riyan Parag a figure of 225.02. Isn’t this a more realistic portrayal of everyone’s impact this season?

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